La Fuente Learning Center GED Classes

December 3, 2012 by  
Filed under Citizenship, Families, Students

Here is information about La Fuente Learning Center’s GED classes.

GED Flyer 3 color email

UT Advise TX Thank You Card

August 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Students

Prosecutorial Discretion for Certain Young People

July 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Families, Students

As of June 15, 2012, certain young people brought to the United States as children are eligible to request deferred action. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is developing a process for these young people to request deferred action and will implement the process within 60 days.

DO NOT REQUEST DEFERRED ACTION YET!
USCIS is not yet accepting requests for deferred action through this process

Until USCIS announces how to request deferred action…
DO:
• Visit www.uscis.gov to learn more about the announcement, eligibility criteria and to find the latest updates.
• Contact USCIS for more information at 1-800-375-5283.
• Contact ICE at 1-888-351-4024 if you are currently in removal proceedings and meet the criteria explained below.
• Visit www.uscis.gov/avoidscams to learn more about how you can avoid becoming a victim of an immigration service scam.
The Wrong Help Can Hurt!

DO NOT:
• Pay anyone who claims they can request deferred action on your behalf or apply for employment authorization through this new process before USCIS announces an implementation date.
• Send an application seeking work authorization related to this process.

Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano issued a memorandum setting forth criteria that make certain individuals eligible for an exercise of prosecutorial discretion to prevent them from being placed into removal proceedings or removed from the United States. To be considered on an individualized basis for deferred action under this process, an individual must:
• Have come to the United States under the age of sixteen;
• Have continuously resided in the United States for at least five years preceding June 15, 2012 and have been physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012;
• Currently be in school, have graduated from high school, have obtained a general education development certificate, or be an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States;
• Not have been convicted of a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense, multiple misdemeanor offenses, or otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety;
• Not be above the age of thirty.

For additional information regarding this new process for certain young people, please visit www.uscis.gov or call 1-800-375-5283. Customer assistance is available in English and Spanish.

Deferred Action for Certain Young Immigrants: Don’t Get Scammed

July 3, 2012 by  
Filed under Blog, Students

On June 15, 2012, DHS announced that certain young people who entered the U.S.
before age 16 will no longer be removed from the United States. Qualifying individuals
will be granted “deferred action” and be eligible for a work permit.

You cannot apply for deferred action at this time. If you are currently in removal
proceedings, you may be offered deferred action by Immigration and Customs
Enforcement (ICE). Otherwise, you will have to wait until the government finalizes an
application process.

If you believe you are eligible for deferred action but face imminent
removal from the United States, contact either the Law Enforcement
Support Center’s hotline at 18554486903 (staffed 24/7) or the ICE
Office of the Public Advocate at 18883514024 (staffed 9am – 5pm,
Monday – Friday) or EROPublicAdvocate@ice.dhs.gov.

You should only trust information from a reliable source, such as an official government
website or reputable legal or charitable organizations. Consult with a qualified
immigration attorney before requesting deferred action.

Eligibility: In order to be eligible for deferred action, an individual must prove that he or
she:
1) Was under 31 years old on June 15, 2012;
2) Came to the United States under the age of 16;
3) Has continuously resided in the United States for at least five years before June
15, 2012, and was physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012;
4) Is currently attending school, has graduated from high school, has obtained a
G.E.D. certificate, or is an honorably discharged veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces
or Coast Guard;
5) Has not been convicted of a felony offense, significant misdemeanor offense,
multiple misdemeanor offenses, nor otherwise poses a threat to the community or
national security.

Requests for deferred action will be reviewed on a casebycase
basis, and not every young immigrant will qualify. Individuals who are found to be ineligible due to
criminal history or because they represent a danger to the community may be
subject to removal or other immigration enforcement action. DHS considers
many misdemeanor offenses to be “significant misdemeanors,” including those for which
the individual received no jail time. If you have ever been arrested by the police, talk to
a qualified immigration attorney before applying for deferred action.

Don’t get scammed! The government will inform the public how to apply, within 60
days or by August 13, 2012. Until then, you CANNOT apply for deferred action. You
should NOT “turn yourself in” to start the process. However, you CAN begin gathering
the documents that you will need to apply for deferred action:
1) Documents, such as a birth certificate or passport, showing age on June 15, 2012;
2) Financial records, medical records, school records, employment records, and
military records that demonstrate an individual came to the U.S. before the age of
16, AND resided in the U.S. for at least five years preceding June 15, 2012 AND
was physically present in the U.S. as of June 15, 2012;
3) School records, including diplomas, GED certificates, report cards, school
transcripts and other evidence of enrollment, or documentation as an honorably
discharged veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces or Coast Guard.

More information is available at: www.aila.org/deferredaction, www.uscis.gov,
www.ice.gov, USCIS hotline at 18003755283,
(staffed from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m), ICE
Office of the Public Advocate hotline at 18883514024
(staffed 9am – 5pm, Monday –
Friday), www.unitedwedream.org

Literacy Coalition of Central Texas 2008 Give Thanks Give Literacy Campaign

November 19, 2008 by  
Filed under Students

litcoal1

<>litcoal2

This information provided is not intended to replace the advice of an attorney but is merely provided as a public service. Each immigration case is different. For more information, consult with Thomas Esparza, Jr., Board Certified Specialist in Immigration and Nationality Law with more than 32 years of experience.