USCIS Update to Forms 2017

January 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Attorneys, Features

Update to Form I-602, Application By Refugee For Waiver of Grounds of Excludability
12/30/2016 02:00 PM EST

New edition dated 12/19/16. Previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-134, Affidavit of Support
12/30/2016 01:56 PM EST

New edition dated 11/30/16. Starting 02/27/17, USCIS will only accept the 11/30/16 edition. Until then, you can use the 02/19/14 edition and other previous editions.

Update to Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card
12/27/2016 12:10 PM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-102, Application for Replacement/Initial Nonimmigrant Arrival-Departure Document
12/27/2016 12:09 PM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker
12/27/2016 12:09 PM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. Previous editions dated 08/13/15, 03/26/15 and 10/23/14 also accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-129F, Petition for Alien Fiancé(e)
12/27/2016 12:07 PM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative
12/27/2016 12:06 PM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-131A, Application for Travel Document (Carrier Documentation)
12/27/2016 12:06 PM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.
Update to Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal
12/27/2016 12:04 PM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-290B, Notice of Appeal or Motion
12/27/2016 12:03 PM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status
12/27/2016 12:02 PM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-526, Immigrant Petition by Alien Entrepreneur
12/27/2016 12:01 PM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-539, Application To Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status
12/27/2016 12:00 PM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative
12/27/2016 11:58 AM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition
12/27/2016 11:57 AM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-698, Application to Adjust Status from Temporary to Permanent Resident (Under Section 245A of the INA)
12/27/2016 11:55 AM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence
12/27/2016 11:54 AM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-690, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility
12/27/2016 11:53 AM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-800, Petition to Classify Convention Adoptee as an Immediate Relative
12/27/2016 11:51 AM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-800A, Application for Determination of Suitability to Adopt a Child from a Convention Country
12/27/2016 11:50 AM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-817, Application for Family Unity Benefits
12/27/2016 11:50 AM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-824, Application for Action on an Approved Application or Petition
12/27/2016 11:49 AM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form I-929, Petition for Qualifying Family Member of a U-1 Nonimmigrant
12/27/2016 11:46 AM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions

Update to Form N-565, Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document
12/27/2016 11:35 AM EST

New edition dated 06/21/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.

Update to Form N-600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship
12/27/2016 11:34 AM EST

New edition dated 12/23/16. No previous editions accepted. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the Form and Instructions.
For more information, please visit our Forms Updates page.

Parole in Place

December 13, 2013 by  
Filed under Families, Features

PIP Marine_Salute 4

Practice Pointer: Understanding the November 15, 2013
Policy Memorandum on Parole of Certain Military Family Members
December 10, 2013

By: The AILA Military Assistance Program Task Force

On November 15, 2013, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) issued a memorandum
amending the USCIS Adjudicator’s Field Manual “to ensure consistent adjudication” of parole requests
made on behalf of certain military family members.1 The memo states that, generally, it would be an
appropriate exercise of discretion to grant “parole in place” to the spouses, children, and parents of active
duty military personnel, reserve members, and veterans, who are already physically present in the United
States without inspection or admission. The policy is intended to ease the stress and anxiety placed upon
military service members and veterans that is caused by the lack of immigration status of their close
family members in the U.S.

This much-needed memo formally addresses many of the issues that were left to interpretation following
the August 30, 2010 letter from DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano to Rep. Zoe Lofgren and other members
of Congress.2 That letter emphasized DHS’s commitment to assisting military families, and listed several
tools, including parole, that DHS could use to help military dependents secure permanent immigration
status.

Eligibility for Parole in Place:

The decision to grant parole in place is discretionary under INA §212(d)(5)(A). The November 15, 2013
parole memo states that the fact that an individual is a spouse, child, or parent of an active duty member
of the U.S. Armed Forces, member of the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, or veteran who
previously served in the U.S. Armed Forced or Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve “weighs heavily in
favor of parole in place.” Unlike the August 30, 2010 Napolitano letter, the November 15, 2013 parole
memo includes veterans in the class of individuals who can request parole in place for family members.3
The memo further notes that “[a]bsent a criminal conviction or other serious adverse factors, parole in
place would generally be an appropriate exercise of discretion for such an individual.”4 As of the date of
this practice pointer, it is unclear what type of criminal conviction or “other serious adverse factor” would
prevent USCIS from favorably exercising discretion.

Validity Period of a Parole in Place Grant:

The memo states that, if USCIS decides to grant parole in place, the parole is valid for one year with reparole
as appropriate.

Eligibility for Adjustment of Status:

The November 15 memo also clarifies that a person who has been granted parole in place will be eligible
to apply for adjustment of status if the only barrier to adjustment was the lack of inspection and admission
or parole. The memo is clear: “[a]n alien who entered the United States without inspection, but
subsequently receives parole, is not inadmissible under either of the two inadmissibility grounds
contained in INA §212(a)(6)(A)(i).” Therefore, once USCIS grants parole in place, INA §245(a), which
requires that an applicant be “inspected, admitted or paroled” is satisfied. However, the individual must
still satisfy all of the other requirements for adjustment of status, including maintenance of status under
INA §245(c)(2), if he or she is not an immediate relative or the provisions of INA §245(k) do not apply.
Note that parole in place eliminates only the grounds of inadmissibility found in INA §212(a)(6)(A)(i) for
the purpose of adjustment of status. All other grounds of inadmissibility must still be overcome.

What to Include With a Parole in Place Request:

When preparing a parole in place request, attorneys should include the following:

Form I-131, Application for a Travel Document. Note that the memo specifies that NO FEE is
needed.6 Please see the FAQ section at the end of this practice pointer regarding how to properly
complete the I-131.

Evidence of the qualifying family relationship, such as birth certificates, marriage certificates, or
other documentation deemed appropriate to establish the relationship.

Evidence that the applicant for parole in place is the spouse, parent or child of a U.S. military
service member or veteran. If the military service member is currently serving, he or she must be
on active duty or be a member of the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve. Such evidence can
include a copy of the front and back of the DD 1173 (service member’s ID card), military orders,
or other pertinent documentation.

Two passport style photographs of the qualifying family member.

Evidence of any additional, favorable discretionary factors that the applicant would like
considered.

Where to File a Parole in Place Request:

The parole in place request, including all documents listed above, should be filed with the director of the
USCIS office with jurisdiction over the qualifying relative’s place of residence.7 Once the appropriate
office is determined, clearly mark the package as a parole in place request, and include a copy of the
November 15, 2013 memo to avoid rejection of the package upon filing. Individuals may also hand-file
the application by making an InfoPass appointment.

FAQs on Filing a Parole in Place Request:

1. Can the I-130/I-485 be filed together with the Parole in Place request?
Until further guidance is provided by USCIS, filing the I-130/I-485 at the same time as the parole
in place request does not appear to be appropriate or practical. In order for the qualifying family
member to be eligible to adjust status under INA §245, parole must first be granted. Therefore, to
avoid rejection by the lockbox, individuals should file the I-130/I-485 with the lockbox only after
parole in place has been granted and an I-94 evidencing parole has been issued to the applicant.
This process would also avoid the unnecessary loss of filing fees should parole in place be
denied.

2. Can an I-765 application for employment authorization be filed with the I-131 parole in place
application?

Though the parole memo does not specify that filing an I-765 with the I-131 is allowed, 8 CFR
§274a.12(c)(11) permits the grant of employment authorization to an alien who has been paroled
into the United States for emergent reasons or in the public interest. However, parole in place
requests are filed at the local USCIS field offices which have no ability to generate EADs.
Therefore, filing an I-765 with the I-131 is likely not feasible in practice. It may be more prudent
to file the I-765 application with the I-130/I-485 application package once the parole in place
request is approved. Alternatively, once parole has been granted, a person may file an I-765 with
the lockbox pursuant to 8 CFR §274a.12(c)(11).

3. What crimes prevent the favorable exercise of discretion for a parole in place application?
The memo does not say what criminal convictions would prevent the favorable exercise of
discretion. However, the memo does state that absent “a criminal conviction or other serious
adverse factors” (emphasis added), parole would generally be an appropriate exercise of
discretion. This wording seems to indicate that: 1) one criminal conviction may be sufficient to
deny parole in place; and 2) when read in context with “other serious adverse factors” that the
crime may have to be a “serious” offense. Clarification of the question whether any criminal
conviction will render an individual ineligible for parole in place is being sought.

4. What about qualifying relatives who live with the service member abroad and have a prior
immigration violation which prevents admission to the United States?
The memo is clear that only qualifying family members who are in the United States are eligible
for parole in place.

5. On Form I-131, under “Part 2, Application Type,” there is no box to check that indicates the
applicant is applying for parole in place. How do I let the local USCIS office know that we are
requesting parole in place on the I-131 form?

AILA suggests that applicants check off box 1d (“I am applying for an Advance Parole
Document to allow me to return to the United States after temporary foreign travel”) under “Part
2, Application Type,” and write “Parole in Place” in red ink next to the description. Then, under
Part 4, Information About Your Proposed Travel, Question 1a, Purpose of Trip, the applicant
would write “Parole in Place (PIP)” again on this line. To answer Part 4, Question 1b, List the countries you intend to visit, the applicant should write “N/A.” Applicants should be sure that the
USCIS office adjudicating the I-131 understands that the applicant is submitting a parole in place
request.

6. What is the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve?
The Ready Reserve is comprised of military members of the Reserve and National Guard,
organized in units, or as individuals, liable for recall to active duty to augment the active
components in time of war or national emergency (10 USC §§12301(a), 12302). The Selected
Reserve consists of those units and individuals within the Ready Reserve designated by their
respective Services and approved by the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, as so essential to initial
wartime missions that they have priority over all other Reserves. All Selected Reservists are in an
active status. 10 USC §10143. Most members of the Army National Guard and Air National
Guard are in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, as are persons who perform paid duty
each year in the Army Reserve, Air Force Reserve, Navy Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve, and
Coast Guard Reserve. The Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve does not include inactive or
retired Reservists.

Half of eligible immigrants sign up for deferred deportation program

August 14, 2013 by  
Filed under Families, Features

By Cindy Carcamo

August 14, 2013, 7:00 a.m.

TUCSON — Stifled by a variety of obstacles — from fees to fear — fewer than half of those eligible for immigration relief have taken advantage of an Obama administration program launched a year ago, according to a new study.

About 49% of those eligible have applied for a work permit and a two-year reprieve from possible deportation, according to the Migration Policy Institute, a think tank in Washington D.C. that studies the worldwide movement of people.

This week marks the one-year anniversary of the implementation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which is intended to protect a group of people who came to the United States as children and stayed illegally.

Currently, 1.09 million people in the nation qualify for the program, which halts the deportation of those who are under 31-years-old and meet certain requirements, the institute reported. An estimated 538,000 have applied for the program, according to the institute, which used U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services data paired with Census Bureau statistics for its findings.

The study’s results didn’t surprise Carmen Cornejo, an adviser with The Arizona Dream Act Coalition.

Cornejo said that one of the biggest impediments for those who are in the country illegally and qualify for the program can be linked to the $465 fee. It can be financially out of reach for many low-income families, she said. Sometimes the expense can spike with complicated cases that require an attorney.

“Some of the families practically don’t have money,” Cornejo said. “They are still saving for the fees for their sons and daughters.”

Also, some would-be applicants are misinformed and scared that immigration officials may use their information to track down family members who are currently in the country illegally and who cannot qualify for the program, she added.

In Cornejo’s state of Arizona, 58% of the 33,000 who are currently eligible to apply in the state have done so, according to the institute. In other southwestern states, the application rates are lower.

California stands at 49%, while Texas comes in at 54%, according to the institute, which looked at 10 states with the largest number of potential beneficiaries of the program.

In addition, it appears that application rates of people born in Mexico and Central America were especially high, compared to other countries, according to the report. For instance, 64% of Mexicans eligible for the program put in an application while only about 14% from the Dominican Republic had done the same.

Currently, immigration officials have denied 1% — a little more than 5,000 — of all applications. Nearly 75% have been approved. The rest await a decision, the report said.

Update:

May 1, 2013 by  
Filed under Citizenship, Features

Starting Monday, May 6, 2013, USCIS will implement Customer Identity Verification (CIV) in its field offices. Individuals will now be required to submit biometric data, specifically fingerprints and photographs, when appearing at USCIS offices for interviews or to receive evidence of an immigration benefit. CIV will help to both defend against threats to national security and protect customers from identity fraud by enhancing the agency’s ability to verify identity.

The Conditional Waiver for Unlawful Presence

February 13, 2013 by  
Filed under Citizenship, Families, Features

The Conditional Waiver for Unlawful Presence

A new procedure, not a new law.

Six things that you should know About the Procedure to Obtain the Stateside Conditional Waiver for unlawful presence on Form I-601ª

            Happy New Year.  Starting March 4, 2013, certain relatives of American citizens who are in the country illegally and need a waiver of unlawful presence before being eligible for a green card can get a decision on their case before leaving the United States.

For those who can take advantage of the new rule, this means peace of mind, knowing that their loved one is likely to successfully complete the immigration process and not be stranded in a foreign country for an unknown length of time.  For some, however, the new rule will do nothing to resolve their immigration issues.

1.      What is the new rule and how can it help my family?

            Under current law, many immigrants who enter the country illegally or overstay their visas cannot apply for permanent residence (a “green card”) in the U.S., and instead must finish the immigration process abroad.  Unfortunately, just leaving the country—even to pick up a visa sponsored by a family member—automatically makes the intending immigrant subject to a penalty for their “unlawful presence,” potentially separating them from their family for up to ten years.

            For some, but not all, the penalty can be waived.  Before this new rule, immigrants could be stranded outside the country for weeks, months or even years while waiting for a decision on whether they could return to their life in the United States. And all that time, the immigrant was stuck abroad, usually with no legal way to return.  Many families endured the emotional strain, financial hardship and dangerous conditions. Others simply were unwilling to take the risk. The new rule means that many immigrants will leave the United States, knowing in advance that their case will probably be approved, and they could be back with their families—as a legal resident—in a matter of days.

2.      Who can apply under the new rule?

            Only applicants who are an immediate relative of a US citizen (spouses, parents and certain children) can apply at this time, though the rule may later be expanded to other relatives.

            The applicant must be physically present in the United States, and not already have a scheduled interview at a U.S. consulate abroad.  Also, the provisional waiver is only available if the sole issue holding up a case is unlawful presence.  Applicants who have criminal issues or other immigration violations cannot use the provisional procedure.

Individuals who are in immigration court or who have an order of removal or voluntary departure may not qualify unless they get special permission from the government and a court order resolving their case.

            To be successful, applicants must show that denying the case would be an extreme hardship to their qualifying relative(s); the impact on the immigrant doesn’t count.  Hardship factors can include family separation, economic hardship, medical issues, country conditions abroad, and any other difficulty or harm faced by the qualifying relative(s), if the waiver isn’t granted.

3.      What does it mean that the waiver is “provisional?”

            Even if a waiver is granted, the approval is “provisional.”  As a practical matter, this means that the government has reviewed the case and believes that the waiver should be granted, but there is no guarantee that a case will be successful if facts change or new information comes to light.  For example, if an applicant had previous immigration violations or criminal history, the provisional waiver will be revoked.

If any new issues arise, and the applicant is still eligible for a waiver, he or she will be able to re-apply using the existing process, but will have to wait abroad for a decision on their case.

4.      When can I apply?

            The new rule goes into effect on March 4, 2013, and no filings will be accepted before that date. You can only apply for a provisional waiver after an immigrant petition has been approved.  If you haven’t filed yet or you’re still waiting for a decision on a pending petition, you can’t apply for the provisional waiver—yet.

5.      What else do I need to know about provisional waivers?

            A provisional waiver is not a legal status, and even an approved waiver doesn’t provide work authorization, a social security number or a driver’s license. Having a provisional waiver will not protect you from deportation or any other consequences of being in the country illegally.

If an application for a provisional waiver is denied, there is no appeal.  If you have more or better evidence to prove your case, you can re-file, with a new filing fee. Remember, not everyone can be sponsored or qualify for a waiver, and just as importantly, not everyone needs a waiver.

6.      Do I need to work with an attorney?

            The immigration process can take months, even years, and government filing fees and other expenses are significant—it’s best to know your options before investing time and money.  A thorough legal consultation should look at all aspects of your immigration history to find the best solution for your family, not just evaluate eligibility for a provisional waiver.

Always work with a licensed immigration attorney.  Never trust legal advice from an unregulated consultant or notario. Consider consulting with an experienced immigration lawyer before starting the process to make sure that you qualify, and that stateside waiver processing is the best solution for your immigration case.

This information is presented for your information only.  It is not intended to take the place of a detailed consultation with the attorneys

Thomas Esparza or Jacqueline L. Watson

 

All Clients of Thomas Esparza or Jacqueline L. Watson should make an appointment with their paralegal immediately.

El Perdon Provisional

Una nueva procedimiento, no una nueva ley.

 

 

Clientes de Tomas Esparza o Jacqueline Watson llamen hoy para fijar su cita!!!

 

Seis Cosas Que Necesita Saber Sobre el  Procesamiento Estatal de la Exención I-601ª

            Feliz Año Nuevo.  Un cambio en el procedimiento que hemos esperado demasiado tiempo nos regalo la Presidencia!  A partir del 4 de marzo del 2013, algunos familiares de ciudadanos estadounidenses que se encuentran en el país ilegalmente y necesitan una renuncia de presencia ilegal antes de ser elegible para una tarjeta de residencia pueden obtener una decisión sobre su caso antes de salir de los Estados Unidos. 

            Para aquellos que pueden aprovechar de la nueva norma, esto significa la tranquilidad de saber que su ser querido pueda completar con éxito el proceso de inmigración y no estar varado en un país extranjero durante un periodo de tiempo indeterminado.  Para algunos, sin embargo, la nueva norma no hará nada para resolver sus problemas migratorios. 

  1.  ¿Cuál es el nuevo reglamento y cómo puede ayudar a mi familia?

            Bajo la ley actual, muchos de los inmigrantes que ingresan ilegalmente en el país o permanecen dentro del país más tiempo que es  permitido por su visa no pueden solicitar por residencia permanente (una “green card”) en los Estados Unidos, sino que deben finalizar el proceso de inmigración en el extranjero.  Desafortunadamente, simplemente salir del país, incluso para recoger una visa patrocinada por un miembro de la familia, automáticamente hace al inmigrante sujeto a una pena por su “presencia ilegal,” potencialmente separándolo de su familia durante un máximo de diez años. 

            Para algunos, pero no todos, la pena puede ser suspendida.  Antes de esta nueva regla, los inmigrantes podrían quedar varados fuera del país durante semanas, meses o incluso años mientras esperaban de una decisión sobre si podrían regresar a su vida en los Estados Unidos.  Y durante todo ese tiempo, el inmigrante permanecía  en el extranjero, y muchas veces sin algún modo regresar legalmente.  Muchas familias han padecido la tensión emocional, dificultades financieras y condiciones peligrosas.  Otros simplemente no estaban dispuestos a tomar el riesgo.  El nuevo reglamento significa que muchos inmigrantes saldrán de los Estados Unidos sabiendo de antemano que su caso probablemente será aprobado y que podrán volver con sus familias, como residente legal, en cuestión de días. 

  1.  
  2. ¿Quién puede solicitar bajo el nuevo reglamento?

            Solo los solicitantes que sean parientes inmediatos de un ciudadano de los Estados Unidos (como cónyuges, padres y algunos hijos) pueden aplicar en este momento, aunque el reglamento puede ser ampliado con posterioridad a otros parientes. 

                El solicitante debe estar físicamente presente en los Estados Unidos, y no deberá tener una entrevista programada en un consulado estadounidense en el extranjero.  Además, la renuncia provisional solo está disponible si la única cuestión que sostiene el caso es la presencia ilegal.  Los solicitantes que tienen problemas penales u otras violaciones de inmigración  no pueden utilizar el procedimiento provisional. 

            Las personas que están ante un tribunal de inmigración o que tienen una orden de expulsión o retiro voluntario no pueden calificar a menos que obtengan un permiso especial de parte del gobierno y una orden judicial para resolver su caso. 

            Para tener éxito, los solicitantes deben demostrar que si el caso es negado entonces esto perjurada a su pariente(s) que califica(n); el impacto sobre el inmigrante no cuenta.  Estas dificultades pueden incluir la separación de la familia, problemas económicos, problemas médicos, las condiciones del país en el extranjero y cualquier otra dificultad o peligro que enfrenta el pariente que califica si la exención no se concede. 

  1. ¿Quién quiere decir que la exención es “provisional”?

            Aun si se otorga una exención, la aprobación es “provisional.”  Como cuestión práctica, esto significa que el gobierno ha examinado el caso y considera que debe concederse la exención, pero no hay ninguna garantía de que un caso puede tener éxito si cambian los hechos o nueva información es proporcionada.  Por ejemplo, si un solicitante tiene violaciones de inmigración anteriores o antecedentes penales, la exención provisional será revocada. 

            Si surgen problemas, y el solicitante todavía es elegible para una exención, él o ella aun podrán volver a aplicar mediante el proceso existente, pero tendrá que esperar en el extranjero para una decisión sobre su caso. 

  1.  
  2. ¿Cuándo puedo aplicar?

            La nueva norma entrara en vigencia el 4 de marzo del 2013, y ninguna solicitud será aceptada antes de dicha fecha.  Solo puede solicitar una exención provisional después de que una petición de inmigración haya sido aprobada.  Si usted todavía no ha aplicado o aún está esperando una decisión sobre una petición pendiente, entonces usted todavía no podrá aplicar para la exención provisional. 

  1.  
  2. ¿Qué más debo saber acerca de las exenciones provisionales?

            Una exención provisional no es un estatus legal, e incluso una exención aprobada no proporciona autorización de trabajo, un número de seguro social o licencia de conducir.  El hecho de tener una exención provisional no quiere decir que será protegido de la deportación o cualquier otra consecuencia de estar en el país ilegalmente.

            Si la solicitud para una exención provisional es negada, no hay ninguna apelación.  So tiene más o mejores pruebas para probar su caso, entonces usted puede volver a solicitar con un nuevo honorario de solicitud.  Recuerde que no todos pueden ser patrocinados o califican para una exención, y no todos necesitan una exención. 

9.         ¿Necesito contratar a un abogado?

            El proceso de inmigración puede durar meses, incluso años, y los honorarios de solicitud gobernamentales y otros gastos son significativos, lo cual  es mejor que conozca sus opciones antes de invertir tiempo y dinero.  Una consulta legal completa debe contemplar todos los aspectos de su historial de inmigración para encontrar la mejor solución para su familia, y no solo evaluar la elegibilidad para una exención provisional. 

            Considere consultar con un abogado de inmigración con experiencia como Esparza o Watson antes de iniciar el proceso para asegurarse de que usted califica y que el procesamiento de exención estatal es la mejor solución para su caso de inmigración. 

Recursos adicionales

            Thomas Esparza, Jr. Y Jacqueline L. Watson son miembros de los American Immigration Lawyers Association. Hemos completado con requisitos sobre la educación legal y seguro de negligencia y hemos sido miembros de AILA 33 años y 13 años respectivos. Somos abogados especializados en asuntos de inmigracion con mas de 48 anos de experiencia.

            Cuidado con abogados que toman todo tipo de caso como heridas personales, leyes criminales, peternidad, Custodia.  ¿Deseas pone tu vida en las manos de alquien que no se dedica a inmigracion?  No creo!  Notarios publicos o el organización lucrativo Cristo Vive Para Inmigrantes no son calificados para ayudarle y en la circumstancia de Cristo Vive etan bajo un orden de dejar de tratar, cobrar o amenesar inmigrantes.  Levante su expediente de ellos lo mas pronto posible.  Es su expediente. 

 

Llamenos hoy para fijar cita con su asistente legal!

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This information provided is not intended to replace the advice of an attorney but is merely provided as a public service. Each immigration case is different. For more information, consult with Thomas Esparza, Jr., Board Certified Specialist in Immigration and Nationality Law with more than 32 years of experience.